Coldplay fan and vocalist Chris Martin who wants to watch a concert from the British band now has to wait for some time.

 Coldplay fan and vocalist Chris Martin who wants to watch a concert from the British band now has to wait for some time.  Chris Martin in an interview with the BBC said the band would not tour for their latest album  Everyday Life , until they could find a way to do a tour that did not have a negative impact on the environment.  "We will spend the next two years designing sustainable, environmentally friendly tours," Martin said as quoted by ABC.net.au on Saturday (23/11/2019).  Martin said in addition to the tour providing positive benefits, so far the trip for the musicians, crew, and also their equipment became one of the major obstacles in terms of their impact on the environment.  Chris Martin also wants that the use of disposable plastics is prohibited at Coldplay shows and power plants using solar energy.  "We've done a lot of great shows. Now we want to change so that we don't just get something but we can also give.  Coldplay last performed in Australia in 2016, with a tour of  A Head Full of Dreams .  According to the Green Touring Network, a music network in Germany, the colossal performances of a big band are always activities that have a big impact on the environment.  The stage shows must be moved by truck from one city to another, sometimes even between continents.  Band members and other crew members who can sometimes be dozens of people must be flown by plane and then take the bus.  Large buildings or stadiums require large amounts of electricity and also need food for those present and ultimately produce large amounts of waste.  Not to mention the audience who brought trash and polluted while watching.  Music Concert as One of the Largest Contributors to Emissions  According to the Network's Touring Guide, the second largest contributor to emission in music shows is the journey taken by the audience to the venue of the event.  Radiohead, the first group that tried to do an environmentally friendly tour found that in the tour in 2003 and 2006 that the biggest emission came from the audience, because most of them used cars to the venue.  The band then changed their way of touring and in 2008 launched a tour called the Carbon Neutral World Tour.  Their performances are performed in the suburbs, which are close to public transport and spectators are encouraged to use public transport.  Their equipment is also hired locally and the venue is recommended to be as environmentally friendly as possible.  Berish Bilander, one of the executive directors of Green Music Australia, who has campaigned for environmentally friendly activities in the music industry, said that plastic waste was much discussed this year in the industry with efforts to reduce it.  He said he was very supportive of what Coldplay was doing.  "Right now our planet is experiencing a crisis and all humans are affected," Bilander said.  "Artists have an important role, and are happy to see famous artists do something," he said.


Chris Martin in an interview with the BBC said the band would not tour for their latest album  Everyday Life , until they could find a way to do a tour that did not have a negative impact on the environment.

"We will spend the next two years designing sustainable, environmentally friendly tours," Martin said as quoted by ABC.net.au on Saturday (23/11/2019).

Martin said in addition to the tour providing positive benefits, so far the trip for the musicians, crew, and also their equipment became one of the major obstacles in terms of their impact on the environment.

Chris Martin also wants that the use of disposable plastics is prohibited at Coldplay shows and power plants using solar energy.

"We've done a lot of great shows. Now we want to change so that we don't just get something but we can also give.

Coldplay last performed in Australia in 2016, with a tour of  A Head Full of Dreams .

According to the Green Touring Network, a music network in Germany, the colossal performances of a big band are always activities that have a big impact on the environment.

The stage shows must be moved by truck from one city to another, sometimes even between continents.

Band members and other crew members who can sometimes be dozens of people must be flown by plane and then take the bus.

Large buildings or stadiums require large amounts of electricity and also need food for those present and ultimately produce large amounts of waste.

Not to mention the audience who brought trash and polluted while watching.

Music Concert as One of the Largest Contributors to Emissions


 Coldplay fan and vocalist Chris Martin who wants to watch a concert from the British band now has to wait for some time.  Chris Martin in an interview with the BBC said the band would not tour for their latest album  Everyday Life , until they could find a way to do a tour that did not have a negative impact on the environment.  "We will spend the next two years designing sustainable, environmentally friendly tours," Martin said as quoted by ABC.net.au on Saturday (23/11/2019).  Martin said in addition to the tour providing positive benefits, so far the trip for the musicians, crew, and also their equipment became one of the major obstacles in terms of their impact on the environment.  Chris Martin also wants that the use of disposable plastics is prohibited at Coldplay shows and power plants using solar energy.  "We've done a lot of great shows. Now we want to change so that we don't just get something but we can also give.  Coldplay last performed in Australia in 2016, with a tour of  A Head Full of Dreams .  According to the Green Touring Network, a music network in Germany, the colossal performances of a big band are always activities that have a big impact on the environment.  The stage shows must be moved by truck from one city to another, sometimes even between continents.  Band members and other crew members who can sometimes be dozens of people must be flown by plane and then take the bus.  Large buildings or stadiums require large amounts of electricity and also need food for those present and ultimately produce large amounts of waste.  Not to mention the audience who brought trash and polluted while watching.  Music Concert as One of the Largest Contributors to Emissions  According to the Network's Touring Guide, the second largest contributor to emission in music shows is the journey taken by the audience to the venue of the event.  Radiohead, the first group that tried to do an environmentally friendly tour found that in the tour in 2003 and 2006 that the biggest emission came from the audience, because most of them used cars to the venue.  The band then changed their way of touring and in 2008 launched a tour called the Carbon Neutral World Tour.  Their performances are performed in the suburbs, which are close to public transport and spectators are encouraged to use public transport.  Their equipment is also hired locally and the venue is recommended to be as environmentally friendly as possible.  Berish Bilander, one of the executive directors of Green Music Australia, who has campaigned for environmentally friendly activities in the music industry, said that plastic waste was much discussed this year in the industry with efforts to reduce it.  He said he was very supportive of what Coldplay was doing.  "Right now our planet is experiencing a crisis and all humans are affected," Bilander said.  "Artists have an important role, and are happy to see famous artists do something," he said.


According to the Network's Touring Guide, the second largest contributor to emission in music shows is the journey taken by the audience to the venue of the event.

Radiohead, the first group that tried to do an environmentally friendly tour found that in the tour in 2003 and 2006 that the biggest emission came from the audience, because most of them used cars to the venue.

The band then changed their way of touring and in 2008 launched a tour called the Carbon Neutral World Tour.

Their performances are performed in the suburbs, which are close to public transport and spectators are encouraged to use public transport.

Their equipment is also hired locally and the venue is recommended to be as environmentally friendly as possible.

Berish Bilander, one of the executive directors of Green Music Australia, who has campaigned for environmentally friendly activities in the music industry, said that plastic waste was much discussed this year in the industry with efforts to reduce it.

He said he was very supportive of what Coldplay was doing.

"Right now our planet is experiencing a crisis and all humans are affected," Bilander said.

"Artists have an important role, and are happy to see famous artists do something," he said.